High Times on the High Line

Written by on November 21, 2010 in NYC Insiders Tips - No comments

photo John Mazlish

For a couple looking to have an outdoor wedding in a more urban setting, perhaps the “High Line,” a relatively new landmark, fits the bill. As described in the Garden Guide: NYC by Nancy Berner and Susan Lowry, the High Line is a “21st Century Promenade, having all the poetry and thrill of the street but none of the noise and hustle.” In its original state, the elevated rail lines served commercial ventures running between Spring Street and 34th. It operated form some 90 years, beginning in the 1840s, serving industry and factories on the far west side of Manhattan. The last train traversed the High Line 30 years ago, when the property was essentially abandoned.

As the High Line languished, there were political factions advanced options for the rail artery that once served the City. While there were some who wanted it demolished, others argued for its restoration as a working rail line. But led by two young New Yorkers, an organization—Friends of the High Line—argued for an innovative public space. A competition was held to select a vision for the park, and a plan devised by two New York City design firms combined an open, elevated public space that retained its industrial feel. Great attention was paid to allowing natural plant growth to continue decorating the space. The High Line meanders over the course of numerous blocks, with plenty of little alcoves where a private wedding could be held, no doubt engaging passers-by. As is evidenced by the photos, the High Line is a striking venue for either a ceremony or post wedding portraits, conveying the intersection of natural beauty and commerce in the Big Apple.
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About the Author

As a professional ceremony officiants I believe in the power and effectiveness of ceremony and ritual to serve basic needs, both of society and you as an individual. In close collaboration with you and your loved ones, I love to create and perform personalized ceremonies that reflect your beliefs, your philosophy of life, and your personality.

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